Daphnia Water Fleas
Daphnia Water Fleas Close Up
Daphnia Water Fleas in a bag

Daphnia

LO-010-250
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£5.85 Exc. VAT
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£5.85
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This product is grown/bred/collected to order.
Quantity must be 1 or more

Daphnia, commonly know as Water Fleas are micro-crustaceans. Daphnia are a text book species ideal for investigations into physiology as their bodies are transparent meaning students can clearly see their internal organs. Daphnia reproduce both sexually and asexually producing a clutch of eggs each time they moult. Daphnia are filter feeders meaning students can watch the movement of food through the gut. Other investigations include looking into the effect of caffeine or temperature on heart rate.

Once you receive your Daphnia decant into a clean tank/jar and keep out of direct sunlight at around 21°C (room temperature) Daphnia can survive like this for 3 to 4 days without further care. If you intend to keep them for longer, transfer into a tank filled with rain water and feed with a pinch of dissolved yeast every 1-3 days (depending on number of Daphnia). The yeast encourages bacterial & algal growth which the Daphnia then feed on. Avoid overfeeding - the Daphnia should clear the water within 8 hours, if they don't, reduce the about of yeast fed. Every week change about 1/3 of their water but do not clear the debris from the bottom of the tank as it may contain eggs.

250g gives around 150 Daphnia, 500g around 300 and 1kg around 600. For other pack sizes please enquire for availability.

Customer Reviews

Based on 3 reviews
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Semira Mohammed
Daphnia

The Daphnia was fantastic, the package arrived on time as you have promised. I am very pleased and recommend for future purchase.
Thank you
Semira

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Eileen Rust
Daphnia

Arrived as promised, very happy with purchase.

M
Michael BALL
The Daphnia culture as for filled all my expectaions

After 7days the culture is going from strength to strength I have provided a well oxygenated environment and the daphnia are doing well. I am currently feeding them a mixture of euglena and algae ( these are founding abundance in Darwins pond water samples)
I could see when the arrived some of the daphnia had eggs, they have now hatched I expect by early next month I shall have to set up a second culture
I have also noted there are cyclops in the culture, several of these have egg sacks some have clearly hatched When i viewed a sample under a stereomicroscope i could see larval nymphs of these little copepods dashing around the petri dish